Camp Workcoeman

The Second Season

A mere two months after Camp Workcoeman closed for the 1924 season, Council Executive Earl Beebe resigned. It was several months before Chief Beebe found a new job as the Waterbury Council Executive, so other employment opportunities probably were not his main motivation. However, the death of Frank Coe, the Torrington Council’s main benefactor, may have played a part in his decision. The executive board hired Herbert McLeod, an Assistant Scoutmaster in Troop 2, to serve as the new Council Executive and Camp Chief.

For the summer of 1925, Chief McLeod organized a program very similar to that of the 1924 season, with emphasis on aquatics and pioneering. He recruited Thomas Wall from the previous season’s staff and Robert Freeman, a wilderness guide from Maine. Freeman served as chef for part of the season, but also taught canoeing. He shared his backwoods experience with the boys, and using lumber supplied by Frederick Baldwin, Freeman and the Scouts built a log cabin.

Another program that returned from 1924 was a Scout Honor Society, the Tunxis Indians. The previous season’s members elected the 1925 honor campers. The members met after taps on Saturday night, and their activities were a mix of traditions from Camp Sepunkum and local lore. The honor campers were recognized with a blue tomahawk inserted into the CW of the maroon camp emblem. Athletic events were the other high point of 1925. Several times during the five-week season, the Scouts hiked over to the Hartford Council’s Camp Pioneer. Among other inter-camp challenges, the Scouts played baseball on the diamond that the Torrington Rotary Club built in 1920. At the last game of the season, the Torrington Scouts lost to the Hartford Scouts, 6–7.

The photo below shows the log cabin the campers and staff built in 1925. The cabin was slightly to the west of the present waterfront area.

Log Cabin